Posts Tagged ‘maraschino’

The Police Gazette

Tuesday, June 28th, 2005

Police GazetteFirst off, a big tip of the hat to The Cocktail Chronicles for introducing me to this one. Paul’s much more informative exploration of the Police Gazette can be found here. I reproduce the recipe (as I make it) because if I thought it would help, I’d put up billboards, run off flyers, and write a song or two. It’s really that good. Spicy, herbal, bitter, sweet … complex but perfectly unified, strong but soft-edged. An ideal cocktail, and yet not in the CocktailDB. I may have to start a petition.

3 oz. rye
2 dashes dry vermouth
2 dashes curaçao (orange or white)
2 dashes maraschino
3 dashes simple syrup
2-4 dashes Fee Bros. aromatic bitters, to taste

Fill your mixing tin with crushed ice, add the above, stir and strain.

I’m using Old Overholt rye and Maraska maraschino, Cinzano vermouth and Bols orange curacao. I’ve made it with both Angostura and Fee’s, and while they each have their charms, I’m partial to the latter. I’ll also confess to a bit of sloppiness in the “dash” department — my dashes are unmeasured micro-glugs — but some day I should get around to precisely quantifying exactly how I like it. Technically, a dash is 1/8 tsp, so measure/eyeball accordingly. I’m almost certainly mixing mine a bit wetter than I should, but then again Paul’s gone so far as to cut the rye back to 2 oz, so there must be a fairly forgiving range of ratios.

It’s worth noting that while the Police Gazette is unlikely to appear on your local’s featured drinks list, maraschino is the only uncommon constituent element. Find a bar with maraschino, convince the noble behind the mahogany to produce one, and the dominos may start to fall.

Update : More precise delivery of the dashes — 1/4 oz maraschino, 1/4 oz curaçao, 1/4 oz vermouth, 3/8 oz syrup — reveals that the recipe I cite above is either too heavy on the rye or a bit light on the other ingredients for my taste. It’s a terrible shame, but I’m forced to continue investigating this matter.

The Harlem Cocktail

Friday, April 22nd, 2005

1 1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz pineapple juice
1/4 oz maraschino

Tried this one several days back without documenting — from the category it should be evident: I give it a Bronx cheer. Cited by an eGullet poster as having appeared in the 1935 edition of Mr Boston, my later edition of same provides a wholly different recipe. Regardless, the search for delicious drinks with pineapple continues to bear little fruit. This one proved unpleasant in an unremarkable way — neither good enough nor strong enough to merit sipping, the Harlem invited me to toss it back (or out) and move on. Another waste of good booze.

Country Club Punch

Wednesday, December 31st, 1969

Take 1½ lbs. of Cut Loaf Sugar and rub the lumps on the skins of 4 Lemons and 2 Oranges until the Sugar becomes well saturated with the oil from the skins. Then put the Sugar thus prepared into a large porcelain-lined or agate Mixing vessel, and add:
12 Oranges, sliced.
1 Pineapple, sliced.
1 box Strawberries.
2 bottles (quarts) Apollinaris Water.

Stir thoroughly with oak paddle or large silver ladle, and add:
1 jigger Benedictine.
1 jigger Red Curacoa.
1 jigger Maraschino.
½ jigger Jamaica Rum.
1 quart Brandy.
4 quarts Tokay or Sweet Catawba Wine.
2 quarts Madeira Wine.
4 quarts Chateau Margaux.

Mix well with oak paddle or ladle and strain into another bowl in which has been placed a block of clear ice. Then pour in 6 quarts Champagne. Decorate the Ice with Fruits, Berries, etc. Serve in Punch cups or glasses, dressing each glass with Fruit and Berries from the bowl.

Crimean Cup a la Marmora

Wednesday, December 31st, 1969

(For a Party of 10)

Into a small Punch bowl pour:
1 pint Orgeat Syrup.
2 jiggers Jamaica Rum.
2 jiggers Maraschino.
2½ jiggers Brandy.
2 tablespoonfuls Bar Sugar.
1 quart Champagne.
1 quart Plain Soda.

Stir well; pack the bowl in Fine Ice, and when cold serve in fancy Stem glasses.

Brandy Scaffa

Wednesday, December 31st, 1969

Into a small Wineglass pour:
Green Chartreuse.
Maraschino.
Old Brandy.

In equal proportion to fill the glass, using care as in preparing Crustas, not to allow the colors to blend.